The Good, the Bad and the Ugly on U.S. Student Debt

What to study in Canada

Hi everyone,
My first post here.
I am planning to do an M.A in Canada hoping to be able to get a job there and to live there permanently. This is going to be a very challenging and somewhat long experience and the first issue is that I don't know what I want to/should/need to study. :/
I really don't know where to start and if I should do something I like or do something that is in demand. I was thinking maybe I can describe my qualifications and interests here for you guys to take a look and let me know what you think. I really appreciate any suggestions/ideas.
There are also things to consider and things I'm not sure about that makes choosing what to do more complicated for me.
I'm really sorry if you're head is exploding after reading this but I'm really confused and feel pretty bad that I don't know what I want to do with my life considering trying to jobs already.
Your opinion can help a lot. Maybe you guys can show me a way to be able to realize what I should study.

Thank you very much for your time.
submitted by memehrdad to ImmigrationCanada [link] [comments]

Hi, I'm new into Forex and I have some questions. (sorry for bad grammar but I'm not good in English)

Hi, I live in Portugal where making 800€ its an "decent" amount of money per mouth. I'm not rich, but I'm not poor either but I'm a bit limited about the deposit volume. I can't give 1000€ and to speak frenkly I'm looking for a good broker with a good laverage where I can spend about 10€ - 100€ max.
Like a said, I'm new, I'm a student and I hope someday I will make a living with forex. I know it's a lot of work, I don't know what strategies I'm looking for or what indicators are usefull or not, the only strategie I know so far is the how to identify a trend.
I'm curious about all the groups on Instagram about courses, but I like to think that I'm not that dumb and I don't want do fall in a scam choosing a wrong "guru".
I have some books to read about forex but again, I don't know if they are good or "modern".
So, my questions are: . Is there a good broker with a honest laverage for someone who can only spend 100€ max? . What are the main strategies to study first? . What's better, 1min trade? Day trades? Months trade? . Are robot are actually good and if yes, how to install? . Are copy trading actually legit??
Thanks for the time spend reading my problems and sorry again for the bad English.
submitted by Darksetor to Forex [link] [comments]

What to study for Master's Degree in Canada.

Hi everyone,
My first post here.
I am planning to do an M.A in Canada hoping to be able to get a job there and to live there permanently. This is going to be a very challenging and somewhat long experience and the first issue is that I don't know what I want to/should/need to study. :/
I really don't know where to start and if I should do something I like or do something that is in demand. I was thinking maybe I can describe my qualifications and interests here for you guys to take a look and let me know what you think. I really appreciate any suggestions/ideas.
There are also things to consider and things I'm not sure about that makes choosing what to do more complicated for me.
I'm really sorry if you're head is exploding after reading this but I'm really confused and feel pretty bad that I don't know what I want to do with my life considering trying to jobs already.
Your opinion can help a lot. Maybe you guys can show me a way to be able to realize what I should study.

Thank you very much for your time.
submitted by memehrdad to study [link] [comments]

What to study in grad school? [civil engineer + English teacher}

Hi everyone,
My first post here.
I am planning to do an M.A in Canada hoping to be able to get a job there and to live there permanently. This is going to be a very challenging and somewhat long experience and the first issue is that I don't know what I want to/should/need to study. :/
I really don't know where to start and if I should do something I like or do something that is in demand. I was thinking maybe I can describe my qualifications and interests here for you guys to take a look and let me know what you think. I really appreciate any suggestions/ideas.
There are also things to consider and things I'm not sure about that makes choosing what to do more complicated for me.
  1. Since I really don't like engineering and because I am simply not a good engineer, I really don't want to have to do anything with engineering.
  2. Is teaching English in Canada a viable option in Canada for a non-native English speaker?
  3. Can I do an M.A in finance with a terrible B.A in civil engineering?
  4. Is finance an in-demand profession in Canada?
  5. Should I go to Canada as an Engineering student and change majors later?
I'm really sorry if you're head is exploding after reading this but I'm really confused and feel pretty bad that I don't know what I want to do with my life considering trying to jobs already.
Your opinion can help a lot. Maybe you guys can show me a way to be able to realize what I should study.
Thank you very much for your time.
submitted by memehrdad to GradSchool [link] [comments]

KFC6855/环球潮鞋: The Secrets of Replica Sneaker Selling

KFC6855/环球潮鞋: The Secrets of Replica Sneaker Selling
Following a post from u/donjonne about a HUGE Weibo story on how to actually start your own 1:1 repsneaker empire, I figured as a native Mandarin speaker I gave it a shot and translated the entire article, since I myself am pretty damn intrigued what the guy's speaking.Do note this article is written in March 2017, lots of stuff may have been outdated, and I translated word-for-word with some pruned paragraphs that seems like the fella repeating himself. I absolutely hate the weird flowery prose Mandarin always carry when I work on translations, so apologies if the in-jokes or general writing gets a bit dry.
This is my personal tl;dr without the author's boastful claims, so if you're short on time, here's the quick rundown.

How do replica sneakers get sold?

Taobao: Long history with the reputation for being the single biggest online BST hub, with Tmall and Xianyu Second-hands integrated. Lots of fake reviews and seller reputation ratings. The rep game there got outta hand, CEO of Alibaba stepped in and cleaned house, thus everyone moved to...
WeChat: Lots more convoluted, no proper tracking and confirmation like a real shopping app and build quality can vary greatly between sneaker models from the same seller. But through word-of-mouth, standout resellers get recommended more organically, of course you need connections to start with.
Agents: Your best friend if you're overseas, usually ran by freelancers merely collecting orders, reporting back to resellers and have them directly ship your kicks to your doorstep. Agents can be a single person, or a huge operation i.e. Wegobuy and Ytaopal.

How's the quality tho?

Depends. Some will try to bait-and-switch, some will bond genuine friendships for simply being a return customer. Factories often cut corners to save some dough and end up with a worse rep, so like the purpose of this sub, dig into forums and guide yourself to trustworthy sellers. Author also goes on a tangent and revealed the numbers and figures of selling reps, along with the sheer gold rush he's in now. Read below for more info.

Anything of note?

We're getting ripped off. Real hard, if you're a Mainlander chances are you're being sold 1/3 of the prices we see here. Part of the reason is that the multi-level reselling jacks up the price a lot, so unless you're buying in bulk for the purpose of selling them, good luck finding GET-passable OW AJ1's for less than $70. If you get caught selling, it's fines upwards of ¥50,000 and your license revoked, but nothing too serious beyond that. Author promised more novel shoes get made in the future, like Uggs and non-hypebeast dress shoes or sumthin.

With that outta the way, here's the translation for the whole article, hope you'll learn something for it and if there's any mistakes, feel free to point it out in DMs or just in the comments.
EDIT 17/05/2020: punctuation mistakes and missing formatting, also thanks for the kind words repfam
_______________

GOD'S HAND: The Secrets of Replica Sneaker Selling


Having been in the rep game for around 4 to 5 years, it all started out of sheer curiosity. I spent ¥1099 for Air Force 1's some celebrity wore, only to had my buddy show up on me with a fake pair of the same sneaker only costs ¥300.
Not everyone is some rich parents' spoiled brat where a pair of shoes costing a couple grand is considered pocket change, yet everyone has that sense of envy, the need to follow the hype to really stand out from the crowd, so do I honestly. But then again you'd only wear that pair of grails for only a good couple months and it'll be out of the wave, why not I find myself a more wallet-friendly way to do so?
Ever since dipping my toe into the replica community, I'm making connections, meeting new friends and getting scammed in every step I make, keeping contacts of my favorite sellers (looking back yeah they're not the best and cheapest isn't it huh). I'm deep in the rabbit hole now, buying so many pairs I'm starting to be able to tell batches at a glance, and where to hunt down that very best batch at the cheapest price. At this point it's natural that I'm thinking of selling these reps and becoming a middleman with the best of the batches under one roof (which is what's following below).
Anyone who has dealt with middlemen know that actually tracking down the direct factory outlets are nigh impossible, and the multiple stages of middlemen-ception where bigger but more discreet resellers selling to more minor, smaller middlemen can only make one dream of the sheer profit you can make for being on the very top of the pyramid, that idea has only been a mere blip in my mind. There was once in a bar my fam hollered at me with "Yo you remember that John Doe went to Putian for two years? Dude gave up college and has been filthy stinkin' rich by now!" I was like bah it'll never work out for me, but with the summer break I'd worth giving it a shot and have John Doe on the line. And boy howdy, ain't he wildin' right now with his business.
Some say every Nike you see there's 1/3 chance it's straight outta Putian, some say Nike's LC works by handling a pair of dumb shoes to an uninformed factory worker and have him say "fuck kinda shoes are these, looks cool I guess so it's legit?" The only way is to really tear down the whole sneaker and see the markings in UV, and once we're on the point where we can fake inside tags and its barcodes, ask yourself can call out fakes on feet?
A promotion for \"discount\" NB's on Weibo
Ever seen promos like these?
It's what I saw on Weibo today, and you've seen one like it yourself did you? They all look good on the images and you'd be right that they're photos of the real deal, just that of course the shoes you actually get were reps, and for each pair profits are never above ¥100; I sell ya an NB for ¥165, I'd only make ¥50.

REPLICA SNEAKERS: HOW DO THEY GET SOLD?

TAOBAO
Taobao has always been the single biggest hub for BST. Run by the faceless middlemen, sold by the page visits, and reviewed by the bots. And stores with inflated trust scores were used as a front, once costing hundreds of yuan to buy now go for the tens of thousands. As Taobao is taking action to curb counterfeits to make way for legitimate resellers, these fronts are getting more expensive by the day, since then people took it to WeChat later on.
Ask anyone who ran a Taobao store, and they'd tell you "you'll never make a cent unless you're selling fakes". A pair of (fake) shoes take some ¥100 to make, and can be sold as a legit like the thousands of yuan you see on their listings, you'd get away with dozens of fakes sold this way, where you can properly guage and adjust said price to match your profit margins. Once the rep game got popular and the snowball kept rolling, the problem got too big for Ma Yun to not ignore it and he went full banhammer on every rep seller. With every media outlet roasting Taobao's ass, everyone wises up to the knowledge that almost every sneaker you see could be fakes. The stigma lived on, and no one would touch any store where its place of origin writes "Putian".
When life gives you lemons, you make a whole damn lemonade stand and just circumvent the whole damn thing by appearing that you're not from Putian. Problem solved. As you check your shipping details, it always seems to travel from Shangai, Shenzen, Quanzhou or even goddamn Xiamen of all places, even overseas.

Proxy services are very popular due to China's stringent laws
When sneakers are labeled as being shipped from Hong Kong, of course the sellers gonna say "it's from Hong Kong" but in fact it's shipping from Shenzhen, and the seller's excuse is that the sneakers are going through HK's borders from Shenzen then to the buyer's location. Even if you bought fakes in Tmall however, it won't be as bad as the ones sold as legit retails in Taobao. There's just too many of these rip-offs anyway! Had a reseller came to me to buy 10 pairs of sneakers, I make ¥10 each pair, but he sold it as retails and went on to make ¥500 each. Of course I'd panicked a jacked a prices a bit so I could have my own slice of extra profit to ¥20 each pair, said the factories jacked the prices themselves as an excuse.
Hoe's mad I guess

WECHAT
While profit margins are no higher than Taobao, they still range around a dozen yuan on bulk. For all the actual friends I have in WeChat, I'd never believe them not having owned a replica sneaker in their whole life, blah blah blah "factory direct", "wholesale prices" my ass, who really can head to the factories and buy direct these days? Rep resellers buying bulk from those factories are truly the "direct from factory" purchases. Resellers then selling the reps to middlemen and agents, that's another step. Said middlemen then resell these reps to quote-on-quote "middlemen". (NB: may have been the very resellers we see on the sub) And it goes on and on and then, to you, the customer.The so-called A-grade reps you see on WC, let's say we buy it from the factory at ¥200 (for example, the real deal won't be this cheap) and sell to the end-user for ¥400~¥500, it does in fact look decent. Heck, retails may get "called out" in forums and reps may sneak under the radar. Chat and forum opinions aren't good indicatiors for a rep's actual quality. Thus you may wonder why buy retails at this point? No one would really hit the New Balance outlets at their local Wanda mall and ask the teeny-bop promoter lady if their kicks are legit anyway, so wouldn't this been the dream job you've wanted, right?
SMALL-TIME AGENTS
These sort of agents are mostly handling orders from overseas to cater the westerners, mainly Russian, SE-Asian, North/South American countries etc., and will never be some solo project as they always come in groups of a few dozen staff members. These agent groups can also hire decently well-spoken college students to help converse customers in English and pay them good pocket change, which is eerily similar to how Forex scams work before, but this time they're doing legit businesses for a change. Sort of.
FREELANCE AGENTS
The most common agent you may come across can be your close friends, they get instant payouts for attracting their local classmates to collect orders for reps, and this wannabe hustler reports them back to the resellers to ship to school dorms directly.

REPLICA BUILD AND QUALITY

Replicas reach far, far and wide. You could see your neighborhood cleaner aunt wearing 990v4s, motorbike taxi riders wearing Duck Camo AM90's, your kind old uncle next door exercising in Flyknit Racers and so on. NB, Nike, Converse, Ascis, Kappa; any brand you wanted they got it. ¥100 to ¥500 is what the factories charge, but after it hits resellers with a ¥200 hike, the illusion what seems to be a shoe that'll last breaks down as it wears out after a few wears. Bad stitching? Poorly-tumbled faux-leather? Off-moulded shape? I'd believe you but you sure you can tell if the EVA is fake by just looking on it? Is the gluing pattern underneath it visible even? A good deal of local boutiques sell ¥120 replicas at official retail prices like ¥599, a good ¥400 profit.
Putian factories are split into "heavy" and "light" industries. The heavy industries builds the sneaker as a whole from scratch, while the light industries were like CKD vehicles, where parts are purchased and assembled together instead. and quality of each part of the sneaker depends among factories. Lots of them try to cut corners to save every extra cent, which explains the decreasing quality of recent sneakers you see now. Larger factories has always been delivering consistently decent sneakers, as customers who contacted them are much picker and won't slash prices along with quality out of the blue. The stitching (and Nike Air units/Boost soles even!) is close enough to pass off as retails. Some of the more badass factories can make a batch of 100 brand new replicas for you, just hand in a donor retail pair and they'll get to work.The old dogs in Putian has been around for ages, runs most of the resellers you know and love. They buy reps from the factory direct at ¥140, sell to resellers at ¥160 and have the resellers push ¥180, at these prices the shoes are just not enough to satisfy demand. I've gave it an estimate if the factory got his order to 30 dozen pairs of reps, with each pair a ¥20 profit, we're looking at ¥7,000 a day or ¥20,000 a month in gross profit.
Of course, the Sales and Commerce Assoc. will still take a heavy hand on counterfeit sneakers till today, basically a few sellers every month get caught in the counterfeit business. The offenders walk into the office, sit down, had "the talk" yet again and pay a good ¥30k~¥50k fine and had their licenses taken away, for just awhile. Factories themselves get raided very seldom, maybe a every 6 months only a single factory gets caught per year. Putian has become the leading worldwide repsneaker operation for the entire world, and outputs around 50% the actual worldwide sneaker market, an estimated ¥20bn yearly. The Nikes and Adidases you wear now has an "OEM" for that. You may have bought a brand sneaker [in China], but it may very well be a fake regardless, to be fair the quality itself is indistinguishable anyway.

REPSNEAKER GRADES

1) The Standard Putian's cheapest offering, pretty much trash tier and a certain Taobao sells them the most often :^)
2) The GET Batch A huge improvement from the Standards, and the so-called 1:1 batch from the mouths of others. It's really not, some of the materials itself is not as fine or accurate as the real deal. Tmall often sells these batches, but often get sold as retails.
3) The 1:1 The absolute tip of the high-end replicas. Take it to HuPu.com and only the eagle-eyed few would call you out. Not everyone can get their hands on them, regardless of price. [eg: similar situation to UABat's Union AJ1's]
4) The Retail Nuff said, just retails. (But really, reps cost just 1/5 of the retail price, why bother lol?)
A snapshot of KFC6855's wares

HOW TO TELL FAKES

[The author essentially details how to LC NB998's, so this is best skipped as it adds nothing to the article other than repeating the author's point over and over.]

THE REPSNEAKER FUTURE

If you ever think replica sneakers will only remain within the hypebeast sporty trainer radar, oh you'd be surprised. The replica factories are on full steam, churning out Dr. Martens, UGGS, Tod's and a lot more to come. If you're interested, my WeChat: KFC6855 has them on sale right now, guaranteed to keep ya comfy this winter.

With all that said, I hope you learnt something from this, and now that you know if you really wanted a retail pair to sleep well at night, just don't get 'em in online stores. There's no glitz and glamor selling counterfeit sneakers, it's just business after all.
If you know, you know.

submitted by TeddyTheEspurr to Repsneakers [link] [comments]

Most economical way of paying off student loan from overseas.

I searched through this subreddit and was surprised to see this hasn't been discussed at much length (or I am bad at searching).
I am living overseas in Canada and am being charged 3.5% interest on my student loan balance so I'd like to now start paying it off ASAP.
From what I can see there are a number of possible methods for paying off a student loan from overseas:
I put together a quick table summarizing my options, calculated at 07:00 EDT - 9/8/20. Some things to note:
Method Fee Send Amount (CAD) Recieve Amount (NZD) Notes
TransferWise $8.79 $891.60 $1,000.00
Western Union $0.00 $908.30 $1,000.00
Orbit Remit $0.00 --- --- CAD Not Available
XE $0.00 ? $1,000.00 Website Down
OFX $0.00 $887.67 $1,000.00
Credit Card $0.00 $896.33 $1,000.00
Credit Card $12.72 $909.05 $1,000.00 IRD Convenience fee included (1.42%)​
Direct Debit $0.00 $904.10 $1,000.00
I have a few questions:
Thanks!
submitted by middayjester to PersonalFinanceNZ [link] [comments]

No, the British did not steal $45 trillion from India

This is an updated copy of the version on BadHistory. I plan to update it in accordance with the feedback I got.
I'd like to thank two people who will remain anonymous for helping me greatly with this post (you know who you are)
Three years ago a festschrift for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri was published by Shubhra Chakrabarti, a history teacher at the University of Delhi and Utsa Patnaik, a Marxist economist who taught at JNU until 2010.
One of the essays in the festschirt by Utsa Patnaik was an attempt to quantify the "drain" undergone by India during British Rule. Her conclusion? Britain robbed India of $45 trillion (or £9.2 trillion) during their 200 or so years of rule. This figure was immensely popular, and got republished in several major news outlets (here, here, here, here (they get the number wrong) and more recently here), got a mention from the Minister of External Affairs & returns 29,100 results on Google. There's also plenty of references to it here on Reddit.
Patnaik is not the first to calculate such a figure. Angus Maddison thought it was £100 million, Simon Digby said £1 billion, Javier Estaban said £40 million see Roy (2019). The huge range of figures should set off some alarm bells.
So how did Patnaik calculate this (shockingly large) figure? Well, even though I don't have access to the festschrift, she conveniently has written an article detailing her methodology here. Let's have a look.
How exactly did the British manage to diddle us and drain our wealth’ ? was the question that Basudev Chatterjee (later editor of a volume in the Towards Freedom project) had posed to me 50 years ago when we were fellow-students abroad.
This is begging the question.
After decades of research I find that using India’s commodity export surplus as the measure and applying an interest rate of 5%, the total drain from 1765 to 1938, compounded up to 2016, comes to £9.2 trillion; since $4.86 exchanged for £1 those days, this sum equals about $45 trillion.
This is completely meaningless. To understand why it's meaningless consider India's annual coconut exports. These are almost certainly a surplus but the surplus in trade is countered by the other country buying the product (indeed, by definition, trade surpluses contribute to the GDP of a nation which hardly plays into intuitive conceptualisations of drain).
Furthermore, Dewey (2019) critiques the 5% interest rate.
She [Patnaik] consistently adopts statistical assumptions (such as compound interest at a rate of 5% per annum over centuries) that exaggerate the magnitude of the drain
Moving on:
The exact mechanism of drain, or transfers from India to Britain was quite simple.
Convenient.
Drain theory possessed the political merit of being easily grasped by a nation of peasants. [...] No other idea could arouse people than the thought that they were being taxed so that others in far off lands might live in comfort. [...] It was, therefore, inevitable that the drain theory became the main staple of nationalist political agitation during the Gandhian era.
- Chandra et al. (1989)
The key factor was Britain’s control over our taxation revenues combined with control over India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its booming commodity export surplus with the world. Simply put, Britain used locally raised rupee tax revenues to pay for its net import of goods, a highly abnormal use of budgetary funds not seen in any sovereign country.
The issue with figures like these is they all make certain methodological assumptions that are impossible to prove. From Roy in Frankema et al. (2019):
the "drain theory" of Indian poverty cannot be tested with evidence, for several reasons. First, it rests on the counterfactual that any money saved on account of factor payments abroad would translate into domestic investment, which can never be proved. Second, it rests on "the primitive notion that all payments to foreigners are "drain"", that is, on the assumption that these payments did not contribute to domestic national income to the equivalent extent (Kumar 1985, 384; see also Chaudhuri 1968). Again, this cannot be tested. [...] Fourth, while British officers serving India did receive salaries that were many times that of the average income in India, a paper using cross-country data shows that colonies with better paid officers were governed better (Jones 2013).
Indeed, drain theory rests on some very weak foundations. This, in of itself, should be enough to dismiss any of the other figures that get thrown out. Nonetheless, I felt it would be a useful exercise to continue exploring Patnaik's take on drain theory.
The East India Company from 1765 onwards allocated every year up to one-third of Indian budgetary revenues net of collection costs, to buy a large volume of goods for direct import into Britain, far in excess of that country’s own needs.
So what's going on here? Well Roy (2019) explains it better:
Colonial India ran an export surplus, which, together with foreign investment, was used to pay for services purchased from Britain. These payments included interest on public debt, salaries, and pensions paid to government offcers who had come from Britain, salaries of managers and engineers, guaranteed profts paid to railway companies, and repatriated business profts. How do we know that any of these payments involved paying too much? The answer is we do not.
So what was really happening is the government was paying its workers for services (as well as guaranteeing profits - to promote investment - something the GoI does today Dalal (2019), and promoting business in India), and those workers were remitting some of that money to Britain. This is hardly a drain (unless, of course, Indian diaspora around the world today are "draining" it). In some cases, the remittances would take the form of goods (as described) see Chaudhuri (1983):
It is obvious that these debit items were financed through the export surplus on merchandise account, and later, when railway construction started on a large scale in India, through capital import. Until 1833 the East India Company followed a cumbersome method in remitting the annual home charges. This was to purchase export commodities in India out of revenue, which were then shipped to London and the proceeds from their sale handed over to the home treasury.
While Roy's earlier point argues better paid officers governed better, it is honestly impossible to say what part of the repatriated export surplus was a drain, and what was not. However calling all of it a drain is definitely misguided.
It's worth noting that Patnaik seems to make no attempt to quantify the benefits of the Raj either, Dewey (2019)'s 2nd criticism:
she [Patnaik] consistently ignores research that would tend to cut the economic impact of the drain down to size, such as the work on the sources of investment during the industrial revolution (which shows that industrialisation was financed by the ploughed-back profits of industrialists) or the costs of empire school (which stresses the high price of imperial defence)

Since tropical goods were highly prized in other cold temperate countries which could never produce them, in effect these free goods represented international purchasing power for Britain which kept a part for its own use and re-exported the balance to other countries in Europe and North America against import of food grains, iron and other goods in which it was deficient.
Re-exports necessarily adds value to goods when the goods are processed and when the goods are transported. The country with the largest navy at the time would presumably be in very good stead to do the latter.
The British historians Phyllis Deane and WA Cole presented an incorrect estimate of Britain’s 18th-19th century trade volume, by leaving out re-exports completely. I found that by 1800 Britain’s total trade was 62% higher than their estimate, on applying the correct definition of trade including re-exports, that is used by the United Nations and by all other international organisations.
While interesting, and certainly expected for such an old book, re-exporting necessarily adds value to goods.
When the Crown took over from the Company, from 1861 a clever system was developed under which all of India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its fast-rising commodity export surplus with the world, was intercepted and appropriated by Britain. As before up to a third of India’s rising budgetary revenues was not spent domestically but was set aside as ‘expenditure abroad’.
So, what does this mean? Britain appropriated all of India's earnings, and then spent a third of it aboard? Not exactly. She is describing home charges see Roy (2019) again:
Some of the expenditures on defense and administration were made in sterling and went out of the country. This payment by the government was known as the Home Charges. For example, interest payment on loans raised to finance construction of railways and irrigation works, pensions paid to retired officers, and purchase of stores, were payments in sterling. [...] almost all money that the government paid abroad corresponded to the purchase of a service from abroad. [...] The balance of payments system that emerged after 1800 was based on standard business principles. India bought something and paid for it. State revenues were used to pay for wages of people hired abroad, pay for interest on loans raised abroad, and repatriation of profits on foreign investments coming into India. These were legitimate market transactions.
Indeed, if paying for what you buy is drain, then several billions of us are drained every day.
The Secretary of State for India in Council, based in London, invited foreign importers to deposit with him the payment (in gold, sterling and their own currencies) for their net imports from India, and these gold and forex payments disappeared into the yawning maw of the SoS’s account in the Bank of England.
It should be noted that India having two heads was beneficial, and encouraged investment per Roy (2019):
The fact that the India Office in London managed a part of the monetary system made India creditworthy, stabilized its currency, and encouraged foreign savers to put money into railways and private enterprise in India. Current research on the history of public debt shows that stable and large colonies found it easier to borrow abroad than independent economies because the investors trusted the guarantee of the colonist powers.

Against India’s net foreign earnings he issued bills, termed Council bills (CBs), to an equivalent rupee value. The rate (between gold-linked sterling and silver rupee) at which the bills were issued, was carefully adjusted to the last farthing, so that foreigners would never find it more profitable to ship financial gold as payment directly to Indians, compared to using the CB route. Foreign importers then sent the CBs by post or by telegraph to the export houses in India, that via the exchange banks were paid out of the budgeted provision of sums under ‘expenditure abroad’, and the exporters in turn paid the producers (peasants and artisans) from whom they sourced the goods.
Sunderland (2013) argues CBs had two main roles (and neither were part of a grand plot to keep gold out of India):
Council bills had two roles. They firstly promoted trade by handing the IO some control of the rate of exchange and allowing the exchange banks to remit funds to India and to hedge currency transaction risks. They also enabled the Indian government to transfer cash to England for the payment of its UK commitments.

The United Nations (1962) historical data for 1900 to 1960, show that for three decades up to 1928 (and very likely earlier too) India posted the second highest merchandise export surplus in the world, with USA in the first position. Not only were Indians deprived of every bit of the enormous international purchasing power they had earned over 175 years, even its rupee equivalent was not issued to them since not even the colonial government was credited with any part of India’s net gold and forex earnings against which it could issue rupees. The sleight-of-hand employed, namely ‘paying’ producers out of their own taxes, made India’s export surplus unrequited and constituted a tax-financed drain to the metropolis, as had been correctly pointed out by those highly insightful classical writers, Dadabhai Naoroji and RCDutt.
It doesn't appear that others appreciate their insight Roy (2019):
K. N. Chaudhuri rightly calls such practice ‘confused’ economics ‘coloured by political feelings’.

Surplus budgets to effect such heavy tax-financed transfers had a severe employment–reducing and income-deflating effect: mass consumption was squeezed in order to release export goods. Per capita annual foodgrains absorption in British India declined from 210 kg. during the period 1904-09, to 157 kg. during 1937-41, and to only 137 kg by 1946.
Dewey (1978) points out reliability issues with Indian agriculutural statistics, however this calorie decline persists to this day. Some of it is attributed to less food being consumed at home Smith (2015), a lower infectious disease burden Duh & Spears (2016) and diversified diets Vankatesh et al. (2016).
If even a part of its enormous foreign earnings had been credited to it and not entirely siphoned off, India could have imported modern technology to build up an industrial structure as Japan was doing.
This is, unfortunately, impossible to prove. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication that India would've united (this is arguably more plausible than the given counterfactual1). Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been nuked in WW2, much like Japan. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been invaded by lizard people, much like Japan. The list continues eternally.
Nevertheless, I will charitably examine the given counterfactual anyway. Did pre-colonial India have industrial potential? The answer is a resounding no.
From Gupta (1980):
This article starts from the premise that while economic categories - the extent of commodity production, wage labour, monetarisation of the economy, etc - should be the basis for any analysis of the production relations of pre-British India, it is the nature of class struggles arising out of particular class alignments that finally gives the decisive twist to social change. Arguing on this premise, and analysing the available evidence, this article concludes that there was little potential for industrial revolution before the British arrived in India because, whatever might have been the character of economic categories of that period, the class relations had not sufficiently matured to develop productive forces and the required class struggle for a 'revolution' to take place.
A view echoed in Raychaudhuri (1983):
Yet all of this did not amount to an economic situation comparable to that of western Europe on the eve of the industrial revolution. Her technology - in agriculture as well as manufacturers - had by and large been stagnant for centuries. [...] The weakness of the Indian economy in the mid-eighteenth century, as compared to pre-industrial Europe was not simply a matter of technology and commercial and industrial organization. No scientific or geographical revolution formed part of the eighteenth-century Indian's historical experience. [...] Spontaneous movement towards industrialisation is unlikely in such a situation.
So now we've established India did not have industrial potential, was India similar to Japan just before the Meiji era? The answer, yet again, unsurprisingly, is no. Japan's economic situation was not comparable to India's, which allowed for Japan to finance its revolution. From Yasuba (1986):
All in all, the Japanese standard of living may not have been much below the English standard of living before industrialization, and both of them may have been considerably higher than the Indian standard of living. We can no longer say that Japan started from a pathetically low economic level and achieved a rapid or even "miraculous" economic growth. Japan's per capita income was almost as high as in Western Europe before industrialization, and it was possible for Japan to produce surplus in the Meiji Period to finance private and public capital formation.
The circumstances that led to Meiji Japan were extremely unique. See Tomlinson (1985):
Most modern comparisons between India and Japan, written by either Indianists or Japanese specialists, stress instead that industrial growth in Meiji Japan was the product of unique features that were not reproducible elsewhere. [...] it is undoubtably true that Japan's progress to industrialization has been unique and unrepeatable
So there you have it. Unsubstantiated statistical assumptions, calling any number you can a drain & assuming a counterfactual for no good reason gets you this $45 trillion number. Hopefully that's enough to bury it in the ground.
1. Several authors have affirmed that Indian identity is a colonial artefact. For example see Rajan 1969:
Perhaps the single greatest and most enduring impact of British rule over India is that it created an Indian nation, in the modern political sense. After centuries of rule by different dynasties overparts of the Indian sub-continent, and after about 100 years of British rule, Indians ceased to be merely Bengalis, Maharashtrians,or Tamils, linguistically and culturally.
or see Bryant 2000:
But then, it would be anachronistic to condemn eighteenth-century Indians, who served the British, as collaborators, when the notion of 'democratic' nationalism or of an Indian 'nation' did not then exist. [...] Indians who fought for them, differed from the Europeans in having a primary attachment to a non-belligerent religion, family and local chief, which was stronger than any identity they might have with a more remote prince or 'nation'.

Bibliography

Chakrabarti, Shubra & Patnaik, Utsa (2018). Agrarian and other histories: Essays for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri. Colombia University Press
Hickel, Jason (2018). How the British stole $45 trillion from India. The Guardian
Bhuyan, Aroonim & Sharma, Krishan (2019). The Great Loot: How the British stole $45 trillion from India. Indiapost
Monbiot, George (2020). English Landowners have stolen our rights. It is time to reclaim them. The Guardian
Tsjeng, Zing (2020). How Britain Stole $45 trillion from India with trains | Empires of Dirt. Vice
Chaudhury, Dipanjan (2019). British looted $45 trillion from India in today’s value: Jaishankar. The Economic Times
Roy, Tirthankar (2019). How British rule changed India's economy: The Paradox of the Raj. Palgrave Macmillan
Patnaik, Utsa (2018). How the British impoverished India. Hindustan Times
Tuovila, Alicia (2019). Expenditure method. Investopedia
Dewey, Clive (2019). Changing the guard: The dissolution of the nationalist–Marxist orthodoxy in the agrarian and agricultural history of India. The Indian Economic & Social History Review
Chandra, Bipan et al. (1989). India's Struggle for Independence, 1857-1947. Penguin Books
Frankema, Ewout & Booth, Anne (2019). Fiscal Capacity and the Colonial State in Asia and Africa, c. 1850-1960. Cambridge University Press
Dalal, Sucheta (2019). IL&FS Controversy: Centre is Paying Up on Sovereign Guarantees to ADB, KfW for Group's Loan. TheWire
Chaudhuri, K.N. (1983). X - Foreign Trade and Balance of Payments (1757–1947). Cambridge University Press
Sunderland, David (2013). Financing the Raj: The City of London and Colonial India, 1858-1940. Boydell Press
Dewey, Clive (1978). Patwari and Chaukidar: Subordinate officials and the reliability of India’s agricultural statistics. Athlone Press
Smith, Lisa (2015). The great Indian calorie debate: Explaining rising undernourishment during India’s rapid economic growth. Food Policy
Duh, Josephine & Spears, Dean (2016). Health and Hunger: Disease, Energy Needs, and the Indian Calorie Consumption Puzzle. The Economic Journal
Vankatesh, P. et al. (2016). Relationship between Food Production and Consumption Diversity in India – Empirical Evidences from Cross Section Analysis. Agricultural Economics Research Review
Gupta, Shaibal (1980). Potential of Industrial Revolution in Pre-British India. Economic and Political Weekly
Raychaudhuri, Tapan (1983). I - The mid-eighteenth-century background. Cambridge University Press
Yasuba, Yasukichi (1986). Standard of Living in Japan Before Industrialization: From what Level did Japan Begin? A Comment. The Journal of Economic History
Tomblinson, B.R. (1985). Writing History Sideways: Lessons for Indian Economic Historians from Meiji Japan. Cambridge University Press
Rajan, M.S. (1969). The Impact of British Rule in India. Journal of Contemporary History
Bryant, G.J. (2000). Indigenous Mercenaries in the Service of European Imperialists: The Case of the Sepoys in the Early British Indian Army, 1750-1800. War in History
submitted by GaslightEveryone to u/GaslightEveryone [link] [comments]

Another noob gone broke

So I started trading forex about a month ago using a signals provider despite all the 80% of people lose money I thought I was different. I had a great start, my $600 account was up to 1200, I of course had no risk management or anything of that sort and so within a few days I was down to 100 after thinking I could trade on my own. When my signals provider gave a signal to sell gold some time a few weeks ago I went all in and closed the trades with around $1000. I then proceeded to buy gold a cut that profit down to around a balance of $500. It was around this time I realised I should probably learn about what I’m doing before I lose the rest of my account. Fast forward to last week my account was at $0 due to my own bad trades but also a severe downswing on the signal providers side, who in my head could do no wrong after the initial profits. Then after a lot of research I set up an EA which over time seemed to have good profit and I completed with backtests for 2 months with great results. Confident I knew everything I put another $1000 in( as a student this is a lot to me) and let it off. I was trading the 4 pairs GBPUSD EURUSD AUDUSD and NZDUSD and the bot was on sell only mode. I activated it yesterday morning and closed the day with around $5 profit and $40 dd which all seemed swell to me. Fast forward to 40 minutes ago I woke up and I was down $700, after closing the trades for some unknown sleepy reason I decided to buy XAUUSD costing me another $160 despite being up on it at one point it came down and hit my stop loss. To make a long story short I’ve lost all but $140 of a $1600 investment because I think I know it all don’t use risk management or listen to the experts. I got what was coming to me, forex is not a get rich quick scheme and I know that now , pitty it’s a month and $1450 later when I could have just listened to every sensible person on the Internet
submitted by Roryrep to Forex [link] [comments]

Thoughts On The Market Series #1 - The New Normal?

Market Outlook: What to Make of This “New Normal”

By ****\*
March 16, 2020
After an incredibly volatile week – which finished with the Dow Jones Industrial Average rallying over 9% on Friday – I suppose my readers might expect me to be quite upbeat about the markets.
Unfortunately, I persist in my overall pessimistic outlook for stocks, and for the economy in general. Friday’s rally essentially negated Thursday’s sell-off, but I don’t expect it to be the start of a sustained turnaround.
We’re getting a taste of that this morning, with the Dow opening down around 7%.
This selloff is coming on the back of an emergency interest rate cut by the Federal Reserve of 100 basis points (to 0%-0.25%) on Sunday… along with the announcement of a new quantitative easing program of $700 billion. (I will write about this further over the next several days.)
As I have been writing for many weeks, the financial bubble – which the Fed created by pumping trillions of dollars into the financial system – has popped. It will take some time for the bubble to deflate to sustainable levels.
Today I’ll walk you through what’s going on in the markets and the economy… what I expect going forward and why… and what it means for us as traders. (You’ll see it’s not all bad news.)

Coronavirus’ Strain on the Global Economy

To start, let’s put things in perspective: This asset deflation was coming one way or another. Covid19 (or coronavirus) has simply accelerated the process.
Major retailers are closing, tourism is getting crushed, universities and schools are sending students home, conventions, sporting events, concerts, and other public gatherings have been cancelled, banks and other financial service firms are going largely virtual, and there has been a massive loss of wealth.
Restaurant data suggests that consumer demand is dropping sharply, and the global travel bans will only worsen the situation.
Commercial real estate is another sector that looks particularly vulnerable. We are almost certain to see a very sharp and pronounced economic slowdown here in the United States, and elsewhere. In fact, I expect a drop of at least 5% of GDP over the next two quarters, which is quite severe by any standard.
Sure, when this cycle is complete, there will be tremendous amounts of pent-up demand by consumers, but for the time being, the consumer is largely on the sidelines.
Of course, the problems aren’t just in the U.S. China’s numbers look awful. In fact, the government there may have to “massage” their numbers a bit to show a positive GDP in the first quarter. Europe’s numbers will also look dreadful, and South Korea’s economy has been hit badly.
All around the world, borders are being shut, all non-essential businesses are being closed, and people in multiple countries are facing a lockdown of historic proportions. The coronavirus is certainly having a powerful impact, and it looks certain that its impact will persist for a while.
Consider global tourism. It added almost $9 trillion to the global economy in 2018, and roughly 320 million jobs. This market is in serious trouble.
Fracking in the U.S. is another business sector that is in a desperate situation. Millions of jobs and tens of billions of loans are now in jeopardy.
The derivative businesses that this sector supports will be likewise devastated as companies are forced to reduce their workforces or shut down due to the collapse in oil prices. This sector’s suffering will probably force banks to book some big losses despite attempts by the government to support this industry.
In a similar way, the derivative businesses that are supported by the universities and colleges across America are going to really suffer.
There are nearly 20 million students in colleges across the U.S. When they go home for spring vacation and do not return, the effect on the local businesses that colleges and university populations support will be devastating.
What does this “new normal” mean going forward? Let’s take a look…

New Normal

The new normal may become increasingly unpleasant for us. We need to be ready to hunker down for quite some time.
Beyond that, the government needs to handle this crisis far better in the future.
The level of stupidity associated with the massive throngs of people trapped in major airports yesterday, for example, was almost unimaginable.
Instead of facilitating the reduction of social contact and halting the further spread of the coronavirus, the management of the crowds at the airports produced a perfect breeding ground for the spread of the virus.
My guess is that more draconian travel restrictions will be implemented soon, matching to some extent the measures taken across Europe.
This will in turn have a further dampening effect on economic activity in the U.S., putting more and more pressure on the Fed and the government to artificially support a rapidly weakening economy.
Where does this end up? It is too early to say, but a very safe bet is that we will have some months of sharply negative growth. Too many sectors of the economy are going to take a hit to expect anything else.
The Fed has already driven interest rates to zero. Will that help? Unlikely. In fact, as I mentioned at the beginning of this update, the markets are voting with a resounding NO.
The businesses that are most affected by the current economic situation will still suffer. Quantitative easing is hardly a cure-all. In fact, it has been one of the reasons that we have such a mess in our markets today.
The markets have become addicted to the easy money, so more of the same will have little or no impact. We will need real economic demand, not an easier monetary policy.
It won’t help support tourism, for example, or the other sectors getting smashed right now. The government will need to spend at least 5% of GDP, or roughly $1 trillion, to offset the weakness I see coming.
Is it surprising that the Fed and the government take emergency steps to try to stabilize economic growth? Not at all. This is essentially what they have been doing for a long time, so it is completely consistent with their playbook.
Next, I would anticipate the government implementing some massive public-works and infrastructure programs over the coming months. That would be very helpful, and almost certainly quite necessary.
But there’s a problem with this kind of intervention from the government…

What Happens When You Eliminate the Business Cycle

The Fed’s foolish attempt to eliminate business cycles is a significant contributing factor to the volatility we are currently experiencing.
Quantitative easing is nothing more than printing lots and lots of money to support a weak economy and give the appearance of growth and prosperity. In fact, it is a devaluation of the currency’s true buying power.
That in turn artificially drives up the prices of other assets, such as stocks, real estate and gold – but it does not create true wealth. That only comes with non-inflationary growth of goods and services and associated increases in economic output.
Inflation is the government’s way to keep people thinking they are doing better.
To that point: We have seen some traditional safe-haven assets getting destroyed during this time of risk aversion. That has certainly compounded the problems of many investors.
Gold is a great example. As the stock market got violently slammed, people were forced to come up with cash to support their losing positions. Gold became a short-term source of liquidity as people sold their gold holdings in somewhat dramatic fashion. It was one of the few holdings of many people that was not dramatically under water, so people sold it.
The move may have seemed perverse, particularly to people who bought gold as a safe-haven asset, but in times of crisis, all assets tend to become highly correlated, at least short term.
We saw a similar thing happen with long yen exposures and long Bitcoin exposures recently.
The dollar had its strongest one-day rally against the yen since November 2016 as people were forced to sell huge amounts of yen to generate liquidity. Many speculators had made some nice profits recently as the dollar dropped sharply from 112 to 101.30, but they have been forced to book whatever profits they had in this position. Again, this was due to massive losses elsewhere in their portfolios.
Is the yen’s sell-off complete? If it is not complete, it is probably at least close to an attractive level for Japanese investors to start buying yen against a basket of currencies. The major supplies of yen have largely been taken off the table for now.
For example, the yen had been a popular funding currency for “carry” plays. People were selling yen and buying higher-yielding currencies to earn the interest rate difference between the liability currency (yen) and the funding currency (for example, the U.S. dollar).
Carry plays are very unpopular in times of great uncertainty and volatility, however, so that supply of yen will be largely gone for quite some time. Plus, the yield advantage of currencies such as the U.S. dollar, Canadian dollar, and Australian dollar versus the yen is nearly gone.
In addition, at the end of the Japanese fiscal year , there is usually heavy demand for yen as Japanese corporations need to bring home a portion of their overseas holdings for balance sheet window dressing. I don’t expect that pressure to be different this year.
Just as the safe-haven assets of yen and gold got aggressively sold, Bitcoin also got hammered. It was driven by a similar theme – people had big losses and they needed to produce liquidity quickly. Selling Bitcoin became one of the sources of that liquidity.

Heavy Price Deflation Ahead

Overall, there is a chance that this scenario turns into something truly ugly, with sustained price deflation across many parts of the economy. We will certainly have price deflation in many sectors, at least on a temporary basis.
Why does that matter over the long term?
Price deflation is the most debilitating economic development in a society that is debt-laden – like the U.S. today. Prices of assets come down… and the debt becomes progressively bigger and bigger.
The balance sheet of oil company Chesapeake Energy is a classic example. It’s carrying almost $10 billion worth of debt… versus a market cap of only about $600 million. Talk about leverage! When the company had a market cap of $10 billion, that debt level didn’t appear so terrifying.
Although this is an extreme example for illustrative purposes, the massive debt loads of China would seem more and more frightening if we were to sink into flat or negative growth cycles for a while. The government’s resources are already being strained, and it can artificially support only so many failing companies.
The U.S. has gigantic levels of debt as well, but it has the advantage of being the world’s true hegemon, and the U.S. dollar is the world’s reserve currency. This creates a tremendous amount of leverage and power in financing its debt.
The U.S. has been able to impose its will on its trading partners to trade major commodities in dollars. This has created a constant demand for the dollar that offsets, to a large extent, the massive trade deficit that the U.S. runs.
For example, if a German company wants to buy oil, then it needs to hold dollars. This creates a constant demand for dollar assets.
In short, the dollar’s status as the true global reserve currency is far more important than most people realize. China does not hold this advantage.

What to Do Now

In terms of how to position ourselves going forward, I strongly recommend that people continue with a defensive attitude regarding stocks. There could be a lot more downside to come. Likewise, we could see some panic selling in other asset classes.
The best thing right now is to be liquid and patient, ready to pounce on special opportunities when they present themselves.
For sure, there will be some exceptional opportunities, but it is too early to commit ourselves to just one industry. These opportunities could come in diverse sectors such as commercial real estate, hospitality, travel and leisure, and others.
As for the forex markets, the volatility in the currencies is extreme, so we are a bit cautious.
I still like the yen as a safe-haven asset. I likewise still want to sell the Australian dollar, the New Zealand dollar, and the Canadian dollar as liability currencies.
Why? The Bank of Canada, the Reserve Bank of Australia, and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand have all taken aggressive steps recently, slashing interest rates. These currencies are all weak, and they will get weaker.
Finding an ideal entry for a trade, however, is tricky. Therefore, we are being extra careful with our trading. We always prioritize the preservation of capital over generating profits, and we will continue with this premise.
At the same time, volatility in the markets is fantastic for traders. We expect many excellent opportunities to present themselves over the coming days and weeks as prices get driven to extreme levels and mispricings appear. So stay tuned.
submitted by ParallaxFX to Forex [link] [comments]

Become a financial investor with £300 and make £50 for doing nothing

Good Day! If you are looking for a quick easy way to earn £50 in commission then you are in the right place.
Wether you're a student, full-time/part time worker or unemployed you can do this easily in 30 minutes or less.
Many people are promoting forex programmes that only benefit themselves and probably offer you a book that explains nothing nothing more than you can learn on babypips.com
I offer an educational group on an app called telegram (You can download it off the App Store, Android store or windows store.) And we can help you become traders not by selling worthless signals but by teaching you how to trade independently, a lifetime service for free.
Now all this sounds too good to be true right? And what about that '£50 commission you told me about?'
Well I work with a brokerage that when I get signed up and you trade with them I earn commission, For you doing so I am willing to give back to my team £50 via PayPal, Skrill or BTC, whatever floats your boat as a way of saying, Since you helped me, i'll help you.
Plus I am offering you another investment opportunity in yourself, The way I think about trading on the financial markets is not a 'Get rich quick' scheme, or a 100% Guaranteed profit making strategy. I Just like many other traders have had bad weeks/months on the markets but the way to overcome it is to manage your risk and to make sure your bad weeks or months are nothing compared to your good ones. If you invest £1000 into a savings account and leave it there on say your 0.01% interest rate for a year you now have £1010. Congratulations you bank has now done for you what you could do in a week easily. You can open a trade on the lowest risk possible and make that if you find the right swing in the market, which with the right guidance and mindset and experiment, is not all too hard to do.
Depositing with a broker is like depositing into a bank account. I can 100% guarantee there will be someone reading this thinking this is a scam, they are just going tot take your money and run. Be assured that I never see your money, when you hand over money to deposit cash into your bank account do you see your cashier take it and put it in their wallet/purse and then it not show up into your account? You are simply depositing money into your own account that only you will have access too and it is there for you to do what you would like with, you can be risky and trade big though I wouldn't recommend this, if you want to though I think you shout find the swing that would work the best for it, find every confirmation possible and enter where there is lowest risk to your account. But for most traders actually wanting to make a steady investment on their capital they can trade low risk, find the swings exactly how I just mentioned and grow your account bit by bit.
As I said previously we offer training in the markets and this is exactly what we are trying to achieve. We don't charge a monthly service fee unlike most in this line of work, instead we actually make our living trading and use the commission from the broker as a service charge, basically like a tip to our weekly profits we use for leisure or to take the Mrs out for dinner :)
If you are interested or have any questions drop a message to either me privately or if you think it is beneficial to everyone reading then add it to the bottom of this thread.
We are more than happy to speak to you over telegram 1-1 and if you need to you can voice call over the app too. However you must be 18+ have some sort of ID and credit/debit card to sign up with the broker.
** If you are unsure when signing up with the broker you can research them/call them whatever you like. We only work with brokers that are registered under the FCA (Financial Conduct Authority)
submitted by Will_AFX to u/Will_AFX [link] [comments]

My different type of gambling story

I just feel like I finally need to share my story (only person who knows so far is my sister, I absolutely needed to tell someone).
So I've never understood the appeal of gambling. I never played slots, never ran poker for money or anything. My first sports bet was a Floyd Mayweather fight. Knowing what I know about boxing, getting a 20% return on my investment for May fighting McGregor was an absolute no-brainer. What I didn't know, though, is that I signed up for an extra promo and the cash out would not work. So this quickly spiraled into parlays and obscure tennis and football matches all over the world to be able to cash out what I put in. I lost 200 bucks, but the insight into people analyzing these things all day was somewhat fun. Shit result, but nothing that really hurt retrospectively. Wrote that off and never ever looked back at sports betting.
Enter summer 2019. I get interested in the stock market. I read a lot, I actually do research on financial statements and decide to invest in actual stocks. It works. Commissions take the fun out, make gains miniscule, but it works. Enter finding out about Forex and CFDs. Leveraged. Again I start slowly, news tickers, books, lots of observation. Technical analysis is like old people horoscopes, but if I see movements that overshoot, I find out what causes them and decide if reversing them might make sense. I start with 200€ again. And it works. Beginners luck and the fact the stakes weren't high, but after a couple of weeks im up by 500€. 150% gain, Over 50 positive trades in succession. Not a single loss. The perfectionism will become my downfall as you might imagine.
October '19. The FED is injecting repos into a market that keeps having these mini-recessions. The liquidity brings the spikes they hoped for, but the underlying problems won't just dissapear. So slowly, I am shorting the market. It keeps running up - I become aware that these trades will be longer term. I can hold the positions for a year. I know it will blow, I just wasn't sure when. On the ride up, I keep shorting. I'm slow to realize how the margin shrinks. I need to deposit more money. I can spare another 500. And another 250. And another 500. They say the market can be irrational longer than you can be solvent. November I lose my job.
By January the P/L hits -4500€. I'm confident that this can't hold but I am running out of money. I'm ashamed to ask for financial help and I would never risk losing anyone else's money. So the credit card has to to. My card, my debt.
WWIII almost kicks off the year and it finally dips. A single night later I witness the strength of the irrationality. My mental time frame is now to hold until middle of march.
But the margin kills me, I am running out of money. I can't hold my positions. So one after another I start closing, panicking, how will I make this back?? This is it: I'll raise the stakes and just make this back. After all, these were my very first losing trades, even though they were huge. This is where I start to realize I am now gambling. I'm blindly taking positions to make money as fast as possible.
Instead of making it back, I keep losing more.
3000 gone.
another 1500.
1500 in a day.
700.
1150.
Today I'm down 8000€. On a historic day. The one I was actually anticipating since October. The "coulda woulda shouldas" are incredible in this one. Not only would I still have 8000€, but I would've raked some extreme profits if I was able to hold.
Instead, being unemployed gave me all the time in the world to watch charts and treat this liek a game I could gamble on. Unneccessary trade over unnecessary trade, ever shorter time frames, chasing every loss. The chasing and the frequency made me realize I have an addiction. The fact I deleted the app and still kept checking charts, just to hop back in and lose again.
I started listening to the after gambling podcast and all the themes were so familiar, even when I wasn't betting, playing slots or cards or roulette. The mechanisms that ruined me were exactly the same. I just sold myself this dream instead of having someone else advertise it to me.
This is by far the lowest point of my life so far and I can't tell wether that's a good or a bad thing.
Debt is now about 1.5k + 6k student loans. Just the thought that I could be debt free today kills me. The thoughts of the vacations, the furniture and all the little gifts and trinkets the money could've been for me and the most loving girlfriend I have. It's gut wrenching. But more than anything else: The sleep, the health, the peace of mind that I have lost - the time - all the things I could have spent my time on. Educating myself, sports. Life was fuckin great until October, I ran my first half marathon; today I feel like a shell of my actual self.
I am sorry for this massive wall of text, but I really needed to let go of this. Today is day 1 and we will count to infinity. Have a great day and keep those spirits high. <3
submitted by _IdesOfMarch to problemgambling [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path for FX?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!

FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year.


Edit: probably should have mentioned that I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. So no I don't intend on using my own money to trade for a while lol
submitted by VictoryLane7 to Forex [link] [comments]

Should I become a doc? (sos problems but here for laughs)

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to shittyadvice [link] [comments]

Should I become a doctor?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Should I quit the medical path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to FinancialCareers [link] [comments]

Should I change my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to Advice [link] [comments]

To be or not to be: A doctor

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerchange [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year. also I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. I trader money and get some of the profits. So I wouldn't be using my own money for a while
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year. also I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. I trader money and get some of the profits. So I wouldn't be using my own money for a while
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year. also I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. I trader money and get some of the profits. So I wouldn't be using my own money for a while
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

12 years of "repairing" myself + mental re-calibration on what's important to me.

Hi!
I've read some posts here and felt like this could be a good place to maybe get a helpful perspective.
I am 32 years old and all choices that I have made so far in my life were driven by insecurity, anxiety and need as well as longing for approval. My biggest weaknesses are consistency and the ability to get massively excited, that plummets almost as fast as it rises.
I am an ENFP (look up "MBTI") and during my entire time in high school my main interests were making people happy and wanting to be liked. I am not clumsy, but I acted like I was to give my classmates a reason to laugh. I wanted to see them smile, even if I had to pay for it. I excelled in Sports and English and I had no love left for math - my primary school math-teacher ridiculed me in front of the class when I barely 8 and in the past I sometimes wondered whether that messed with me somehow. I cared little about grades, as my main focus was a) having fun and b) good relationships. I was very lazy and I hardly ever did any pre- or post-prep. I was indeed liked by most students as they were always happy to see me and I was invited to most birthday parties etc. and I was also bullied by those classmates who were less popular as they gave comments like "look, the education-gap is coming" and quite a number of other events. All those comments stung and some girls told me to defend myself, because they noticed those harsh comments. I never defended myself, because a) I was afraid b) I didn't know how, because I was conflict-averse by nature.
I was 18. I knew about my bad grades and I was massively embarrassed because of that, but I still didn't focus on studying but having good relationships. I compensated by working out and I noticed a massively growing interest on how the body works. Anatomy, physiology were my thing. Over time still during High School girls would start notice a change in my physique and guys sometimes stared at my arms. I was far away from a bodybuilder, but I was more muscular.
Towards the end of High School some classmates would ask me "so do you want to become a fitness trainer? *snarky chuckle*". In that very moment this option died for me, because according to those classmates a fitness coach was nothing one could be proud of. I was like a leave in the wind - dependent on the thoughts, comments and judgements of others. I neither knew how to make decisions for myself now how to be responsible for myself.
I graduated from High School with two things: 1. with barely any preparation at all and 2. without a slightest amount of self-esteem
I've always had a deep and loving relationship with my parents, but I never shared any of the events that happened at school. I was a master of ignoring acting like everything was fine. (Where those character traits come from is another topic of course, but I want to be as objective as possible here.)
At 20 years all I knew was that I had to study... like all of my classmates. I decided to study sports science and I trained for a month, 6 days a week, several hours a day. I went to the local pharmacy and asked for legal drugs to help my body recover faster. I qualified for studying sports, but my GPA was too low to get accepted in the same year. I decided to pick a different subject, because not starting a study in the same year was not an option - to much peer pressure in my head. I picked a major that completely antagonized my character - it was the only option I found. I had to move far away from my parents and while it was frightening in the beginning, I started to enjoy it after a few weeks. I quickly noticed that my major was nothing for me, but I liked to live on my own terms so I neither quit nor did I tell my parents that this major was a bad choice. I lived in the moment until my circumstances at college forced me to quit.
I was 23. I felt bad for quitting, although I knew this major was a torture for me. I didn't want to go back to my parents and at the same time I felt like I had to make up for the lost time by picking a major that would let me shine in a supposedly good light. I wanted to redeem myself. Again... I didn't think about what would be good for me, but I looked at myself through the eyes of other people. Sport Science popped back into my head. In my head Sport Science wouldn't give me the credit I felt like I needed to redeem myself from my High School-failure. I decided to go for Sports Medicine, but I had to wait a few years to get accepted into the program. I was hellbent on following that road, so I successfully became a registered nurse in the meantime.
I was 27. I wasn't accepted into the medical program and I still had to wait. I was running low on finances and I detested the work as a nurse. Not the work itself was the problem, but its societal reputation. It didn't give me the alleged prestige I needed to regain my self-esteem which I was still longing for. I decided to try a completely different industry. I started working for a service provider that produced blueprints.
I was 29. I still wasn't accepted into the medical program and I decided that it was enough. I had waited 5 years, received nurse training in the meantime. I moved back to my parents and almost decided to do Sport Science, but I didn't. Also during those years I met a number of software engineers who told me about their work and how many job offers they receive on a regular basis. That tempted me. So I decided to study informatics. Futuristic stuff had always fascinated me and I thought virtual reality is cool. I watched and read a lot of material on software engineering and I prepped myself with tons of speeches the one from Steve Jobs that said "programming teaches you how to think...".
During the first year I noticed that I didn't enjoy it. Learning programming was tough! It still was fascinating to me though and I buckled down. I passed, but I still didn't get hooked. Programming made me feel smart, because of all the seemingly cryptic languages. I felt like this could be something to make up for my failure and dump reputation at High School. Sometimes I would meet people who said "he is an IT guy" and it made me shudder. In my head I said "I'm no IT guy, I'm a Sport Scientist.", but I didn't say it out loud.
I was 30. I continued with my study, because I didn't want to quit again and I started feeling depressed. I didn't want to get up in the morning. I didn't want to smile. I didn't want to meet people, which was completely contrary to my nature. When friends asked me how study was going and how I felt I said "Oh well, I'm good. Study is going alright." while thinking at the same time "don't ask me about my study.".
Only very few people in my life are able to see through my cloak - my always smiling persona. As a little kid a teacher would ask my Mum how it was possible that I was always happy. I actually was happy, because I was backed by my parent's unconditional love. I am and always will be utmost thankful for that, way beyond words can express. Being more true to myself, my emotions and letting more people in is something I've been learning continuously.
I was 31 and whilst I kept studying and feeling down, I started reading, watching and listening to anything that had to do with motivation, life-purpose and entrepreneurship to push myself out of the depressed feeling. I wanted to stimulate myself so I read Elon Musk's, Steve Job's, Jack Ma's and Richard Branson's biographies. I also started reading about stock trading, forex trading and online advertisement. I dove into those topics, because (a) of interest (b) to distract myself (c) to regain my happiness, which is basically (b) as well and lastly d) to find out what else was out there.
On a positive note... by feeling depressed, I encountered a whole new world in terms of business and entrepreneurship. Thanks to all that self-imposed input, I learned a lot about myself and that academia is not the only way to financial opportunities. Side-note: I grew up with the notion that a college degree is inevitable.
...it's crazy how my High School memories still knock on my door and I have to be vigilant to not get caught up in them.
If you read until here I salute you.
My feelings of depression come and go. I am still studying and working part time. I have lost a considerable amount of hair, because of stress and worries. I sometimes feel like I have aged fast-forward because of that. I still live with my parents. I can't imagine working in the IT industry longterm and I can't help but thinking about Sports Science. Since I've been diving into the world of entrepreneurship I am also keeping a list of projects that I'd love to put into practice. I keep conceptualizing and some ideas seem to be good enough to me to turn them into an mvp. Recently I found a college that allows me to do a 1 year bachelor in Sport Science, because it takes into account my precious education in nursing. A whole lot of scattered thoughts and ideas.
My current study will still take me about 1,5 years and I've been thinking about quitting to turn towards the subject that I've been wanting to do since I was 20. In order to sustain financially I considered going through a coding boot camp (despite what I said a few lines before) so that I can work as a developer while studying part time. If the 1 year Bachelor pans out, I'll be done when I'm 35-ish. I could even imagine doing a PhD some day, because anything sport-related gets me hooked. I want to be a sports coach to other people and I want to raise awareness concerning physiological health. It hurts my brain when I think about the fact that it took me over a decade to accept my innate interest as worthy and valuable and to grow over that remark by my classmate over 12 years ago. It's almost ludicrous to think that such comments can cause emotional trauma that in turn can have such long-lasting influence on decisions.
On the other hand I feel like I had to go through all those feelings of depression to deal more with myself and to become aware of my characteristics and personality traits. Today I know how important conflict is, how benefitial arguments can be, how important emotions are and that it's equally important to not ignore emotions but to go through them and to face them. Honestly... if I didn't know that my parents loved me as much as they do, I'm not sure how far I would've made it.

If you have advice or thoughts concerning turning my fragmented thoughts into a viable roadmap, please feel free. I'm not hoping for a specific answer. I want to let people grant a look inside my head and listen to their general advice.
Thx again for reading.
submitted by Nilayah to Advice [link] [comments]

Kuvera GenXT: My personal review (was a part of it for several months so trust me when I say it’s not worth it)

Initial price: $250 USD
Monthly price: $229 USD (gets waived if 3 people STAY on your team)
Compensation plan: earn $500 USD a month if you introduce 12 people, $1000 USD a month if you introduce 40 people, $2000 USD a month if you introduce 100 people. IMPORTANT NOTES:
• these people need to stay in your organization each month, if one leaves you need to recruit another- so the whole residual income (money paid to you each month no matter what) thing is a lie. • if you bring in one person and that person brings 6 others, they all count towards you. (Hence why it’s a pyramid scheme) • your tree has to be “balanced” meaning that one person can only count towards 50% of your volume. For example: if you’re aiming towards the business builder rank (12 people), and you have a star recruiter on your team, only 6 people from that star recruiters team will count towards you. So warning the residual income definitely is not as easy as it looks.
I initially joined because I really wanted to learn how to invest but I didn’t know where to start. I saw one of the bigger leaders post about the opportunity on thier ig so I decided to join. I was really sceptical at first but my “upline” sent me proof it was legit: A+ rating on BBB (which is bs) , a yahoo finance article, and the company was registered with the SEC. Something still seemed fishy but I brushed it aside (dumb idea). From that day on I was told to go to as many different “opportunity” events as possible so I learn how to pitch the idea, and get my 3 people needed for a free membership. At first I really liked it, everyone was friendly and I felt I was doing something good. However, when I started investing I realized how difficult investing was. ALL of thier trading channels that you’re supposed to “copy and paste” alerts from are complete trash. I did everything I was told (place the alert at consistent allocation, don’t be too risky etc) yet I was either losing money or breaking even each week. One week a leader will say “follow this channel it’s really good” the next week you try it it’s trash again. There was no consistency at all which is needed if you actually want to make profits with forex. Moreover the actual forex education was horrible, the kuvera videos were no help and most “traders” weren’t knowledgeable. If you want to learn from am-mature university students, be my guest and join.
The deeper I got in, the more difficult it got. I was told that I had to post everyday on social media because consistency is the key to success (or so they say). I did that for several months and although I got a few people enrolled, many dropped out eventually. I also had a difficult time recruiting because we weren’t supposed to mention the price (because it’ll scare people), and we weren’t supposed to mention kuvera since a quick google search can reveal a lot of negative things. Instead our goal was to just peak people’s interest and get them out to an event or online webinar where one of the leaders explain it in the least sketchiest way possible. Looking back, I spent a LOT of time on social media as well as the “special events” and even though I’m supposed to have more freedom since it’s not a 9-5 job, it was the complete opposite. If I missed an event my up-lines made me feel guilty and bad about skipping. My team eventually grew to many people, and I was told I had to start “being a leader” and leading by example. I was told to go to every event, host my own events, and cold market everywhere. This blew my mind because the whole reason I joined was because I wanted more time to myself, yet I felt I had less and less. I eventually got fed up because there was barely any trading training, so I slowly stopped going. And that, is when I finally got my common sense back :) . I noticed the following:
1.) a lot of the top leaders who preach that they’ve achieved financial freedom are far from the opposite. They’re either struggling with getting their first 3 people and are just faking how it “changed their life”, or they’re at either bb or exec (500-1000) a month which is barely anything compared to if you got a J.O.B.
2.) Nobody mentions their losses during their presentations. When the leader of GenXT (Matt) asks the “team” how much money they made with the system, it’s always the same people. They rotate them and mix it up every now and then but in general it’s the same pitch. If you want an idea of what the system is actually like, ask different people in the room to show you their profits from day one. Not today, not last week but their entire track record.
  1. They want you to “stay close to the fire” and attend as many events and webinars as possible so you stay brainwashed
4.) All of the team culture events (restaurants, basketball games etc) are all there to distract you from the fact that not many people are making profits.
5.) Don’t believe everything you see on social media. They may be posting lavish lifestyles but every single trip they take together (Florida, Mexico etc) was paid individually. The company does not pitch in for anything. We were actually encouraged to go on these random trips because it creates more marketing content and shows people you’re making money.
6.) I noticed a few members were using demo accounts and posting their results on ig which is very misleading. If you see people making $300+ a day and using crazy allocations, just know they either: have a lot of capital, are risking their entire account, or they’re using a demo.
7.) You need A LOT of money to invest into forex in order to make a liveable profit. Either that or you need to be highly skilled, and trust me you won’t learn anything from kuvera.
8.) All the top leaders that make money through residual or forex are literally glued to thier phones. What’s the point of joining something like this and not having a moment of peace? Why not just get a job at least you’ll have weekends in peace.
9.) They talk a lot of shit about jobs but they’re not all that bad. At least you get paid for everything you do, you could put in 100 hours to an mlm and not receive anything in return. And jobs have health benefits, sick days, and sometimes even paid vacations.
10.) If you’re a part of an mlm you’re not a “business owner”. You’re a sales representative for the company.
11.) A lot of the people involved in mlm’s are literal vultures. They’re always looking for people to recruit everywhere they go which is sad.
12.) mlm’s ARE pyramid schemes, they just hide behind a product so they can legally operate.
13.) MLM’s like kuvera sell a dream rather than a product. They claim you can be your own boss, and become financially free just because the distributers see a few big leaders living that way. There are countless webinars and training sessions that motivate you to keep going and never give up, because the people at the top depend on the people at the bottom. The whole point of creating a team culture, is to make sure that people continue to have the right “mindset”, and to make sure their people do too. Because duplication is the most effective way to create strong recruiters. And although it is possible to make lots of money if you’re good at selling, the entire mlm system is flawed. You could be making loads of money from recruits, but at the expense of potentially hurting a lot of the people you bring in. After all, if no one pays the monthly fee, the company would not be able to pay their distributers.
Some of you may be reading this and thinking I’m pretty stupid for falling for a scheme like this, and you’re right. I lost more than $1500 just from paying the monthly fees but I kept going because my uplines convinced me that it took one of the biggest leaders (rakan khalifa) a year before he made it to his rank. It took me a long time to even find the courage to quit because everyone knew I was in it. I didn’t want to make it seem like I gave up because it was embarrassing. But I’m glad I did. If you’re a part of it right now the best thing to do is walk away, but ofc the choice is up to you.
submitted by Anonyorku57 to yorku [link] [comments]

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